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MANUFACTURING

MANUFACTURING

Interview – Mike Bacidore, Editor-in-Chief, Control Design

Mike Bacidore is chief editor of Control Design and has been an integral part of the Putman Media editorial team since 2007. Previously, he was editorial director at Hughes Communications and a portfolio manager of the human resources and labor law areas at Wolters Kluwer. Bacidore holds a BA from the University of Illinois and an MBA from Lake Forest Graduate School of Management. He is an award-winning columnist, earning multiple regional and national awards from the American Society of Business Publication Editors.

Working With Organized Labor to Build Better Businesses Together
LIFE SCIENCES, MANUFACTURING, SUPPLY CHAIN

Working With Organized Labor to Build Better Businesses Together


In this interview Shawn Otto, Beam Suntory’s Regional Human Resources and Labor Relations Director, answers questions related to his recent presentation at the North American Manufacturing Excellence Summit:

Working With Organized Labor to Build Better Businesses Together

  • Offering an overview of the realities of manufacturing with a unionized workforce
  • Understanding what corporate leadership, shopfloor management, union leadership, and the frontline workers all want and need from one another in a healthy working environment
  • Discussing common stumbling blocks and points of conflict between parties in search of common goals: How do you find win-win scenarios out of what at first seemed to be zero-sum games?
  • Demonstrating that coordination, communication, and cooperation can build competitive advantage through improved productivity and performance
  • What can we do today that we could not do yesterday, and what are we going to be able to do tomorrow that we cannot do today?

Shawn Otto is responsible for Labor Relations and Human Resources for all of Beam Suntory’s Kentucky manufacturing facilities including Clermont, Boston, Frankfort, and Loretto sites. Prior to joining Beam Suntory, Shawn worked for the Ford Motor Company for twenty years in roles of increasing responsibility in and out of the United States in both Labor Relations and Human Resources. Shawn completed a Masters of Science in Education from the University of Louisville, during which time he held a full-time position at General Electric for three years.

LIFE SCIENCES, MANUFACTURING, SUPPLY CHAIN

Interview – Shane Yount on Leadership, Performance, and Developing Your Team

 

Shane Yount, Principal and Author with Competitive Solutions, sat down for a few minutes at the 2017 edition of the North American Manufacturing Excellence Summit. Be sure to also watch Shane’s full workshop presentation, “Business Bootcamp – Driving Greater Execution, Engagement, and Ultimately Earnings!” for more insights.

Shane A. Yount is a nationally recognized author, consultant, and principal of Competitive Solutions, Inc., an international Business Transformation consulting and software firm. Shane’s team pioneered the acclaimed organizational governance system known as Process Based Leadership® (PBL) – A robust governance methodology designed to create a sustainable cadence of clarity, connectivity, and consistency. Shane’s ability to diagnose inefficient governance models and quickly design and deploy solutions that accelerate and amplify team performance has made him and his firm long-term partners with such organizations as Genentech, Pfizer, Alcon, Roche, GSK, Meridian Medical Technologies, and many others. Since 1991, Shane has led the offices of Competitive Solutions, Inc. while publishing three best-selling business novels. His latest novel, Leading Your Business Forward is required reading within many leadership development curriculums being taught within industry today.

LIFE SCIENCES, MANUFACTURING

Business Bootcamp – Driving Greater Execution, Engagement, and Ultimately Earnings!

At NAMES17, Shane Yount of Competitive Solutions asked his audience, “Are you ready to accurately assess your teams, your leaders, and your performance?”

For 25 years, Competitive Solutions, Inc. has been taking organizations through Business Bootcamp with some pretty dramatic results. Learn how to:

  • Drive Business Acumen at a tactical level
  • Move accountability from a concept to a practice and elevate expectations of engagement
  • Eliminate hours of meetings a week by recalibrating intent
  • Moving from abstract OPEX tools to business critical necessities
  • What are the eight essential elements of 21st century leaders?
Impacts of Cultural Change in Under-Performing Facilities
LIFE SCIENCES, MANUFACTURING

Impacts of Cultural Change in Under-Performing Facilities

Michael Brice, VP Offset Operations at INX International Ink Co., led a roundtable lunch-and-learn discussion entitled, “Impacts of Cultural Change in Under-Performing Facilities” at the 2017 edition of the North American Manufacturing Excellence Summit. In this video he shares why he chose this topic and how the lunch conversation went.

Michael Brice is a 31-year printing ink industry veteran.  He has served in every capacity:  lab technician, colormatching, manufacturing, inplant technician and management, sales and senior level management.  Mike became Chief Operating Officer of Superior Printing Inks in 2000 and named is President and COO in 2003.  He also worked in the energy sector and then for Squid Ink Manufacturing for two years until he joined INX International Ink Company in Nov, 2011.  Michael has served INX in a sales capacity as well as organizing and managing INX’s North American distribution effort.  Mike was appointed Director of Offset Operations in 2012 and then, his current position, as Vice President of Offset Operations in 2013.

LIFE SCIENCES, MANUFACTURING

Generate Value from Plant Floor Data with AI and the Digital Twin

In this interview Syed Hoda, Sight Machine’s CMO, discusses how AI and digital twins are making plant floor data useful to manufacturers in whole new ways.

Syed Hoda has served in leadership roles, on three different continents, at both start-up and large technology companies, including Cisco, Scality, ParStream, and IBM. Syed received an MBA from Emory University and an undergraduate in Industrial Engineering from Case Western Reserve University.

How Companies and Communities Find Success Together
LIFE SCIENCES, MANUFACTURING

How Companies and Communities Find Success Together

Frank McCrady attended the 2016 edition of the Biomanufacturing World Summit. In this interview, he shares some of his thoughts about what companies are looking for when they are evaluating where they want to do business and who they want to do business with.

With nearly 30 years of experience in economic development and banking, Frank McCrady has spent 14 of those years as EMCID’s President and CEO, elevating East Montgomery County through strategic planning to a community ready for growth. Under his leadership, development has soared and sales tax revenue for the 158-square mile improvement district has increased by more than 200 percent, from $2.5 million in 2002 to $7.7 million in 2015. Current retail and entertainment projects underway stand to further financial success for the District and the community in the form of job creation, additional business recruiting tools, expanded services, community grants and scholarships for local youth.

McCrady was elected in November 2015 to serve as the Western Region Director of the Southern Economic Development Council (SEDC), the oldest and largest regional economic development association in North America. The SEDC is comprised of 17 states in the southern United States and the District of Columbia. As Western Region Director, McCrady will lend a strong voice for economic leadership to Arkansas, Kansas, Louisiana, Missouri, Oklahoma and Texas. This is the second time McCrady has been elected to the position; he served a one-year term in 2008.

Prior to taking over the leadership position at EMCID, McCrady served as the Deputy Director of Community and Economic Development for Salt Lake City, the Executive Director of the Tulsa Economic Development Corporation and as Operations Manager of Riggs National Bank in Washington, D.C. He also served in the U.S. Army Reserve and retired as a lieutenant colonel after 28 years.

McCrady graduated from the University of Arkansas with a BS in Finance and Banking. He received his MBA from Webster University in St. Louis, MO. McCrady also attended the United States Command and General Staff College in Fort Leavenworth, KS and took the Advanced Operations and Warfighter course, completed studies at the United States Army War College in Pennsylvania, and he took on additional coursework at the National Defense University in Washington, D.C.

Transforming a Medium-Sized Company to Better Engage with Both Customers and Suppliers
MANUFACTURING

Transforming a Medium-Sized Company to Better Engage with Both Customers and Suppliers

Executive Platform Interview with Jack Feng, May 2016

Dr. Jack Feng is in charge of Commercial Vehicle Group’s Lean Six Sigma deployment at over two dozen CVG manufacturing facilities in the US, Mexico, China, India, Australia, UK, Belgium, Czech and Ukraine. Prior to joining CVG, Dr. Feng served different leadership roles within Caterpillar such as Strategy Manager / Master Black Belt, Industrial Engineering Manager, Director of Asia Pacific Lean 6 Sigma Planning and Deployment and Senior Technical Steward. At Caterpillar, he led the development and deployment of Caterpillar Production System (CPS) Master Black Belt program and taught its first four waves.  He also led the development and deployment of the CPS Master Learning Center including CPS Assembly, CPS Machining and CPS Welding for hourly associates as well as for office employees.  Before that, he was a professor of Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering at Bradley University and at Penn State University. Dr. Feng has conducted research projects and consulting services for Boeing, Caterpillar, China National Science Foundation, Cincinnati Machines, Dana Corporation, Deere & Company, Rockwell International, Rubbermaid, Society of Manufacturing Engineers, Tyco Health Division, University of Illinois Medical School and the US State Department Fulbright Program.

A lot of small companies struggle with operational excellence programs, and a lot of big companies struggle to work with their smaller suppliers who do not have effective lean and six sigma and operational excellence programs in place. That is what I want to talk about. I have worked for the very large companies, Fortune 50 companies, and now I am working for a much smaller company. Getting those organizations to work together starts internally and then involves a lot of communication and cross-training.

Do you find large companies want you to work to their standard, or do you try to meet in the middle? How are you aligning your Operational Excellence programs?

Before I joined the company we did not have this kind of structured program. Our big customers – Daimler, Volvo, PACCAR, Caterpillar, and John Deere — asked us to send our people to their Lean and 6-Sigma Black Belt training programs. We still have some of these people working at CVG and others have left to pursue other opportunities.

We had sent people to conform to our customers’ standards of work. They trained our people in customer service or quality improvement or performance improvement. We were not using the same tools or speaking the same language. They requested we send our people to their training programs, and that became part of the organizational requirement from our big customers, but it was not a long-term solution. It might cost us $20,000 for the training plus travel to train someone to our customers’ standards, and then there was no internal support here at CVG once they came back. Now we had people working in isolation: This one works for PACCAR; this one works for Caterpillar; this one works for Daimler and Volvo. There was no corporate organizational support for their work; they felt frustrated when they came back because people did not understand what they were doing.

Now we have decided to go above and beyond what our customers have requested us to do for them. We are going to build our own internal Operational Excellence (OpEx) culture to a very high standard. That’s good because, Number One, we have a lot of customers, and some of them were not requesting anything of us because they did not have a program of their own that they wanted us to follow.

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Effective Change Management Demands Evolution, Not Revolution
MANUFACTURING

Effective Change Management Demands Evolution, Not Revolution

Keith Price has over 40 years of experience in industry with more than two decades of that in senior leadership positions in large international companies. He is an expert on building and implementing lean and quality management programs that work over the long term. His key insight? Change management is about evolution, not revolution. He now works with small and mid-sized companies to equip them with the tools and techniques to turn their strategies into implemented operational plans that yield business results.

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In your experience working with a lot of different companies, it seems so many programs and initiatives fail over the long term. Why is that so, and what can companies do to prevent that from happening?

When people bring in a big program like Lean or Six Sigma or whatever they want to call it, often they bring in consultants and then there is one champion within the business. When they first start, everyone is very gung-ho about it. They get some good results, things work well, and everyone is very happy about it. Then either the consultants go, or the champion has done so well that he or she gets promoted. Unfortunately, they haven’t inculcated the behavior throughout the organization. Without ongoing support, things fail. They had one champion that focused on the program and not the behaviors that having such a program should engender.

I call that revolution rather than evolution.

What I have tended to do is not bring in programs but bring in the tools that one might find in several different programs so that the organization comes up the learning curve almost imperceptibly: They start doing Value Stream Maps, they start doing Five Whys to get to Root Cause, they start doing Paretos, they start doing Affinity Diagrams to deal with qualitative of data, and so on, rather than have a big program. To me, that is one of the big keys: Tools and behaviors not programs.

Another problem is that people sometimes bring in a program, but it is not abundantly clear what the end looks like. One of Covey’s Seven Habits of Highly Effective People is to begin with the end in mind. Knowing where you are going and what you need to do to get there is vitally important. There needs to be a shared vision of what we are striving for so that we monitor progress and adjust course as required.

My first bullet point around what you need to do to make a program successful is that you need clear goals, clear ownership, clear accountability, and clear metrics along the value delivery chain. A story from one of the companies I worked at: There was one guy given the responsibility to get the Net Promoter Score up from where it was to several points higher, but he was the only one in the company who was given that task. There was clear ownership –he was the one guy— but there were not shared metrics along the value delivery chain. The people at the coal face – people on the shop floor or customer site – dealing with customers every day, they had revenue targets and time to fix the product targets based on whether they were in Sales or Service. They did not have any metrics or alignment about increasing the Net Promoter Score up several points. Until that happened, nothing improved.

You need clear ownership. Who owns it? Who is the one person the CEO can go to and ask what is happening? You need clear accountability. What are people trying to deliver? For what are they holding themselves accountable and for what are you holding them accountable? Finally, what are the metrics that will be shared across the value delivery chain and who shares them? If it is only one or two people in the company who know what the metrics are, you really have no chance. We have to have those metrics shared between R&D, Marketing, Operations, Sales, Finance, HR, everywhere. They all have to have some skin in the game and an alignment taking place across the organization.

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Combining Quality Systems and Processes to Focus on What Really Matters
MANUFACTURING

Combining Quality Systems and Processes to Focus on What Really Matters

Dr. Rocky Pinheiro has been in the automotive and parts manufacturing business for 20 years working in roles that include front line supervision, Plant Operations at an executive level and the Vice President of Quality for North American Operations at Acument Global Technologies, the largest fastener manufacturer in the world.

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Reading List: Seven Books to Improve Yourself and Your Organization
MANUFACTURING, SUPPLY CHAIN

Reading List: Seven Books to Improve Yourself and Your Organization

While still in its early days, the EP Thought Leader Series has already spoken with David Barrett, Amir Ghannad, and Norbert Majerus about their ideas and insights into how leadership drives positive outcomes. While all of those interviews are well-worth a read, they are each just a piece of a larger conversation: How do books about business help businesses succeed?

I have had the great good fortune to speak with a number of industry leaders about their working lives, and one of the common threads that connects these men and women together is a love of learning and sharing with others. I know more than one lean manufacturing expert who have incorporated book clubs into their ongoing efforts to build a continuous improvement culture. I know quite a few who have gone on to write their own books as well. For this week’s contribution to the EP Thought Leader Series, I thought it would be interesting to showcase some of the books recommended to me over the years.

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Why are Manufacturers Moving to the Cloud?
MANUFACTURING, SUPPLY CHAIN

Why are Manufacturers Moving to the Cloud?

Jon Chorley is Group Vice President of Product Strategy for Oracle’s Supply Chain Management Applications and leads the team responsible for driving the business requirements and product roadmaps for these applications. These solutions include product lifecycle management, asset lifecycle management, value chain planning and order fulfillment. Mr. Chorley is also the Chief Sustainability Officer for Oracle Corporation. In this role, Jon drives and coordinates all initiatives, both internal and external, related to environmental sustainability. This responsibility covers all areas from IT infrastructure, business operation, and corporate reporting and risk management. Oracle is committed to developing practices and products that help protect the environment.

Mr. Chorley has more 30 years’ experience in the software industry in a broad set of roles including sales, implementation and development. Mr. Chorley has been with Oracle for 17 years. Prior to his current role he was responsible for the development of Oracle’s supply chain logistics applications.

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Lean Champion Leading Lean-Driven Innovation
MANUFACTURING

Lean Champion Leading Lean-Driven Innovation

A Lean Champion at The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company for the last ten years, Norbert Majerus has deployed lean product development processes at Goodyear’s three innovation centers in Akron, Ohio, Colmar-Berg, Luxembourg, and Hanau, Germany.

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